Located in the Southern Cone of the American Continent, with a population of 42 million inhabitants and a territory that is four times larger than France, Argentina is one of the world’s nature reserves. Privileged with outstanding natural richness and extraordinarily diverse landscapes, Argentina boasts high mountains and plains, lush vegetation and extreme deserts, forests and steppes, glaciers and waterfalls.

Mendoza is by far the largest wine region in Argentina. Located on a high-altitude plateau at the edge of the Andes Mountains, the province is responsible for roughly 70 percent of the country\’s annual wine production. The French grape variety Malbec has its New World home in the vineyards of Mendoza, producing red wines of great concentration and intensity. The province lies on the western edge of Argentina, across the Andes Mountains from Chile. While the province is large (it covers a similar area to the state of New York), its viticultural land is clustered mainly in the northern part, just south of Mendoza City. Here, the regions of Lujan de Cuyo, Maipu and the Uco Valley are home to some of the biggest names in Argentinian wine.

THE GRAPES

MALBEC

MALBEC

CABERNET SAUVIGNON

CABERNET SAUVIGNON

MALBEC

Malbec is not originally from Argentina. Its origin is from France and while it was at one point in time the major component of Bordeaux varietals, it’s typically used in Bordeaux these days to flesh out the edges of Right Bank blends. You’ll also find it grown in Cahors, France but more predominately in Argentina were French and Argentine winemakers have found perfect conditions to grow this fruit forward, rich varietal. Key descriptors used when talking about Malbec include plum, raspberry, fig, and spice. If you head to Mendoza, Argentina be prepared to consume plenty of Malbec and steak as it’s the perfect pairing to beef and lamb but also is great with lasagna and many other full-flavored dishes. 

CABERNET SAUVIGNON

The most popular of red wine grape varietals, its name Sauvignon derives from the word “Savage.” Cab is grown in just about every major wine making region. It’s produced as a single varietal and as a major blending component. Cabernet Sauvignon is deep in color, like raspberry, virtually impermeable to light. The varietal is often associated with oak, which in barrel is used to soften the tannins to make it more approachable. Good Cabernet Sauvignon benefits from cellaring several years to soften its tannins, which can be harsh on young Cabs, and bring out the complexity and rich flavors of the grape. Cabernet Sauvignon is a full-bodied and an excellent food wine to pair with nearly any roasted or grilled or braised beef dish, steaks or burgers, duck and game birds, venison, rack of lamb, grilled or roasted lamb, cheese (especially aged blue and/or stinky cheeses), dark bittersweet chocolate and heavier dishes. 

INTERBLEND