Is one of South America\’s most important wine-producing countries. Occupying a thin strip down the western coast of the continent, it is home to a wide range of terroirs, and an equally wide range of wine styles.

The Chilean viticultural industry is often associated in export markets with consistent, good-value wines, but some world-class reds are also made, commanding high prices.

Is one of Chile\’s most important wine-producing regions. Located just south of the capital, Santiago, Maipo Valley is home to some of the country\’s most prestigious wines. It is often described as the \’Bordeaux of South America\’. Maipo is at the very northern end of Chile\’s extensive Central Valley, running from just north of the Rapel Valley up to where the countryside begins to give way to houses and roads in the southern suburbs of Santiago. The Coastal Range separates the area from the Pacific coast, and on the eastern side, the Andes Mountains rise suddenly and dramatically, separating Maipo from the Argentinean region of Mendoza.

THE GRAPES

CARMENERE

CARMENERE

CABERNET SAUVIGNON

CABERNET SAUVIGNON

CARMENERE

Is a dark-skinned grape variety originally from the vineyards of Bordeaux, and which has found a particularly suitable home in Chile. A late-ripening variety, Carmenere needs high levels of sunshine and a warm summer to reach its full potential, but in the right environment it can produce fine, deeply colored red wines, with the attractive meaty plumpness of Merlot and the gently herbaceous, cedary notes of Cabernet Sauvignon.

These similarities are not altogether surprising, as Carmenere is considered by some to be the \”grandfather\” of these Bordeaux varieties.

CABERNET SAUVIGNON

The most popular of red wine grape varietals, its name Sauvignon derives from the word “Savage.” Cab is grown in just about every major wine making region. It’s produced as a single varietal and as a major blending component. Cabernet Sauvignon is deep in color, like raspberry, virtually impermeable to light. The varietal is often associated with oak, which in barrel is used to soften the tannins to make it more approachable. Good Cabernet Sauvignon benefits from cellaring several years to soften its tannins, which can be harsh in young Cabs, and bring out the complexity and rich flavors of the grape. Cabernet Sauvignon is a full-bodied and an excellent food wine to pair with nearly any roasted or grilled or braised beef dish, steaks or burgers, duck and game birds, venison, rack of lamb, grilled or roasted lamb, cheese (especially aged blue and/or stinky cheeses), dark bittersweet chocolate and heavier dishes. 

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