Home to some of the oldest wine-producing regions in the world. Italian wine regions are known for their rich variety of wine styles. Italy\’s twenty wine regions correspond to the twenty administrative regions of the country. Understanding the differences between these regions is very helpful in understanding the different types of Italian wine. Wine in Italy tends to reflect the local cuisine. Regional cuisine also influences the wine.

Today, Tuscany is one of the most famous and prolific wine regions anywhere in Europe.

Climate is a vital factor in this region\’s success as a wine region. Warm, temperate coastal areas are contrasted by inland areas (particularly those in the rolling hills for which the region is so famous), where increased diurnal temperature variation helps to maintain the grapes\’ balance of sugars, acidity and aromatics.

THE GRAPES

SANGIOVESE

SANGIOVESE

SANGIOVESE

Young Sangiovese has fresh fruity flavours of strawberry and a little spiciness, but it readily takes on oaky, even tarry, flavours when aged in barrels. While not as aromatic as other red wine varieties such as Pinot noirCabernet Sauvignon, and Syrah, Sangiovese often has a flavour profile of sour red cherries with earthy aromas and tea leaf notes. Wines made from Sangiovese usually have medium-plus tannins and high acidity.

INTERBLEND