The United States has confidently come of age as one of the world\’s top wine-producing nations. Its reputation may be founded on the global fame of Napa and Sonoma, but the U.S. is home to countless lesser-known wine regions producing world-class wines. Wine has been made in The States for around 400 years, but it is only in the last 40 that American wine really began to earn respect on a global scale. The U.S. is now the world\’s fourth-biggest wine-producing nation (behind France, Italy and Spain) and produces roughly 18.5 million hectoliters each year.

California\’s wonderful year-round weather is as good for our wine as it is for our visitors.

Abundant sunshine ensures a consistent and long grape growing season, while the diversity of our terroir supports a multitude of winegrape varieties and surprising flavor variation within them.

THE GRAPES

CABERNET SAUVIGNON

CABERNET SAUVIGNON

CHARDONNAY

CHARDONNAY

CABERNET SAUVIGNON

The most popular of red wine grape varietals, its name Sauvignon derives from the word “Savage.” Cab is grown in just about every major wine making region. It’s produced as a single varietal and as a major blending component.

Cabernet Sauvignon is deep in color, like raspberry, virtually impermeable to light. The varietal is often associated with oak, which in barrel is used to soften the tannins to make it more approachable.

Good Cabernet Sauvignon benefits from cellaring several years to soften its tannins, which can be harsh in young Cabs, and bring out the complexity and rich flavors of the grape.

Cabernet Sauvignon is a full-bodied and an excellent food wine to pair with nearly any roasted or grilled or braised beef dish, steaks or burgers, duck and game birds, venison, rack of lamb, grilled or roasted lamb, cheese (especially aged blue and/or stinky cheeses), dark bittersweet chocolate and heavier dishes.

CHARDONNAY

Is the world’s most famous white-wine grape and also one of the most widely planted. Although the most highly regarded expressions of the variety are those from Burgundy and California, many high-quality examples are made in Italy, Australia, New Zealand and Argentina.

While many Chardonnay wines have high aromatic complexity, this is usually due to winemaking techniques (particularly the use of oak) rather than the variety\’s intrinsic qualities. Malolactic fermentation gives distinctive buttery aromas. Fermentation and/or maturation in oak barrels contributes notes of vanilla, smoke and hints of sweet spices such as clove and cinnamon. Extended lees contact while in barrel imparts biscuity, doughy flavors.

INTERBLEND